Motorists Killed Two People Walking, Seriously Injured Five More Between July 9 and July 29

dashboard july 9-29

Over the last three weeks, drivers killed two people walking on Denver streets, according to the Denver Police Department. The victims were identified as Abel Shippley, 79, and Richard Jiron.

Five pedestrians and one bicyclist suffered life-changing injuries between July 9 and July 29, while one person in a car was killed.

Denver PD responded to 1,446 crashes during that span.

With this series, we aim to remind politicians, transportation officials, local media, and the public that the cost of inaction on traffic safety policies is extremely high. The longer it takes to redesign our car-centric streets, the more people will get hurt or killed.

The Hancock administration and Denver PD still lack a protocol for alerting the public to serious traffic collisions and tallying them accurately, despite the mayor’s ostensible commitment ending traffic deaths, announced more than two years ago. Hopefully documenting this information, gathered from Denver PD reports, will help drive change from decision-makers and elevate the profile of this public health crisis.

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