Want Streets that Work for People, Not Just Cars? Tell the City in This Survey.

Photo: David Sachs
Photo: David Sachs

As Denver grows, will the city pursue policies that reduce car dependence and cut traffic, or will we let our city get overwhelmed by cars and parking?

Denver city planners are in the process of drafting a document that will shape transportation and development in the city over the next 20 years. It’s called Blueprint Denver, and officials say public feedback will shape the finished product.

That’s where this online survey comes in.

Among other things, the city will use the survey results to gauge the public’s appetite for policies that improve conditions for walking, biking, and transit.

The city wants to find out where you stand on policies like:

  • Parking maximums
  • “Transportation demand management,” i.e. incentives to walk, bike, or ride transit instead of driving
  • Street design standards that prioritize walking and biking
  • Eliminating curb cuts that disrupt busy sidewalks
  • Allowing duplexes, accessory dwelling units, multi-family homes, and other forms of housing in more neighborhoods
  • Mixed-use development that clusters homes, businesses, shopping, and entertainment close together

The results of the survey will influence the final draft of Blueprint Denver, said Denver Community Planning and Development spokesperson Andrea Burns.

This method of decision making has its drawbacks. (Is it a little dubious to seek survey responses on something as basic as building out the city’s existing bicycle plan? Yes.) But this is a chance to weigh in on policies that will shape Denver’s future for a long time to come while the city’s plans are still fluid.

The next draft of Blueprint Denver is due out in late spring.

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