BikeDenver and Executive Director Molly North to Part Ways

DSC_0699
Molly North, left, speaks on the steps of City Hall in support of Vision Zero. Photo: David Sachs

BikeDenver Executive Director Molly North will leave the city’s bike advocacy group on Friday, according to a statement from Mark Chapman, president of BikeDenver’s Board of Directors.

Piep van Heuven, who led BikeDenver from 2008 to 2013, will hold the reins until the board hires a permanent replacement in May.

“I’ve had an incredible ride as the executive director for the past two-and-a-half years,” North said in a statement. “We’ve come a long way in that time and I am very proud of the accomplishments of our tremendous staff. I am grateful to have had the extremely fulfilling and always challenging opportunity to advocate for people who bike in Denver.”

Under North, BikeDenver’s membership and staff doubled. She advocated for Denver’s first protected bike lane on 15th Street and the city’s first parking-protected bike lanes on Arapahoe and Lawrence. North sparked the conversation about a bikeable Broadway, which will undergo a major redesign sooner than later.

“She is leaving the organization positioned for continued success with wonderful momentum from new branding, a fresh website and an impressive year-end fundraising campaign,” Chapman said. “We thank her for her dedication to BikeDenver.”

Chapman said the decision was “a pretty new development” and was mutual. The board will hold a retreat this weekend to begin looking for a new director, which Chapman said could be a national search.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Thursday’s Headlines

|
Yesterday members of the Colorado House Transportation Committee killed HB1099, a bill that would have banned automated traffic enforcement statewide, including photo red light cameras. Top photo: After a legislative victory, members of the Denver Streets Partnership posed for a photo outside of the State Capitol: Jack Todd and Piep van Heuven of Bicycle Colorado, Jill […]
Pullquote: Denver’s disappearing green spaces are not “because of a growing population of people. It’s because of a growing population of cars.” —Alana Miller, Frontier Group

Wednesday’s Headlines

|
From Streetsblog Fact check: Colo. Rep. Jovan Melton wants to ban red light cameras. But he justifies his position with false info. A hearing for his bill will happen at the State Capitol this afternoon. (Streetsblog Denver) Opinion: Denver paved over paradise and put up a parking lot. Contrary to the conclusion of a recent Denver […]
A parking lot across the street from Union Station, Denver's transit hub. Photo: David Sachs

Opinion: Denver Paved Over Paradise and Put up a Parking Lot

|
As the population grows, “nearly half the land in Denver’s city limits is now paved or built over,” shrinking the city's green space, according to a recent series in Denver Post. But there’s something important missing in their account. The city’s pavement problem isn’t because of a growing population of people. It’s because of a growing population of cars. It’s the roads, driveways and – perhaps most egregiously – the parking lots we’ve built to accommodate more cars.