#StreetFail: Crossing the Quebec Street Slant

Photo: Jonothan Stalls
Slippery when icy or dry. Photo: Jonathon Stalls

Here’s a terrible design failure.

I-70 is a barrier between Stapleton and Northfield. The Quebec Street underpass is supposed to provide a way across, but it only works well if you’re driving. Good luck walking it.

There are other ways across I-70 on foot. You could, for instance, walk a half-hour to cross at Central Park Boulevard. You could also take the winding Sand Creek Greenway if you don’t value your time.

Thanks to Jonathon Stalls for sending in this #StreetFail. Got a picture of something that’s making Denver’s streets better? Worse? Share it on Twitter or Facebook with the hashtag #SweetStreet or #StreetFail, and we may share it on the blog. You can email me as well.

  • EatWalkLearn

    Love seeing this make the news! I’ve been working with CDOT and Chris Herndon for a year, but we’ve had no progress. This is a major walking thoroughfare between two major commercial areas. The fact that we’ve got to balance on the edge of the road to get across it is criminal. #itstime

    • neroden

      Maybe it isn’t criminal… but maybe there’s civil liability involved.

      When there’s no sidewalk, people have the absolute legal right to walk IN THE ROAD. (Really. It’s actually a Constitutional right, part of the “right to travel”.)

      This road is signed with high motor vehicle speeds. Therefore CDOT is encouraging high-speed motor traffic IN THE SAME LANE WITH PEDESTRIANS.

      If any pedestrian gets injured, CDOT is 100% liable. I suppose they might use “sovereign immunity” to escape liability, but that doesn’t usually work on torts.

      I really want someone to work up a legal test case based on this theory. Pick a really, really, really blatantly clear case of negligence by the street owner.

      • EatWalkLearn

        Those are super interesting liability thoughts. Do you have any pointers you can provide as references? Thank you!

  • John

    Peoria St. as it crosses under I-70 is only slightly better. There is a sidewalk, but only about 18 inches wide. Recently it was, of course, covered with ice and extremely slippery. Once you cross the westbound on-ramp on the north side, the sidewalk ceases to exist.

    • EatWalkLearn

      Yes, true. Central Park Blvd is nice, but both Peoria and CPB are way out of the way for a walker to transgress to get south of I70 on Quebec.

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