Eyes on the Street: Tail Tracks Plaza Opens Near Union Station

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Looking toward 16th Street. Photo: David Sachs

People walking and biking can traverse the Union Station neighborhood a little more easily now that Tail Tracks Plaza is open between Wewatta and 16th.

The plaza is a helpful cut-through that makes it easier for people to get to and from transit, nearby bike lanes, the 16th Street Mall, and the Cherry Creek Trail. But it’s also designed as a place for people to linger. It has a canopy for outdoor seating, a long bench, and a swing set for all ages (not yet open).

Until recently, this space was unused. Train tracks once ran through the area, and they weren’t removed until 2010. Now repurposed railroad tracks anchor the swings in a nod to the past. Another nod comes in the form of the pavilion’s decorative design, which includes a mosaic that evokes the old tracks.

This plaza will eventually house The Bike Hub, a combination of secure bike parking, repair shop, and bike-share station. So stay tuned for the next phase.

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Looking toward Wewatta Street. Photo: David Sachs

This article originally called the plaza “Trail Tracks Plaza.” It has been corrected to “Tail Tracks Plaza.”

  • JerryG

    Actually, it’s the ‘Tail Tracks Plaza.’

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