Today’s Headlines

  • City Plans More Walkable Neighborhood at Busy I-25 and Broadway Station (Fox31)
  • RTD Tries to Balance Number of Boulder Bus Stops With Rapid Service (Daily Camera)
  • Light Rail Riders Less Frustrated Than Drivers During Snow Storm (DenPo)
  • But Snow Plow Ruined Commute for Some Transit Users (DenPo)
  • Ski Train to Winter Park Unlikely to Happen This Season (CPR)
  • Will Uber Add Wheelchair Access in Denver Like it Did in D.C.? (5280)
  • Mountain Express Lane Opens For Real Saturday on I-70 (9News)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • rorojo

    I am entertained by the amount of people parking or turning in the “protected” bike lanes on Lawrence and Arapahoe now that it has snowed and they can’t see the painted lines. I wonder what they are thinking is up as they maneuver through the white pylons.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Thursday’s Headlines

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Yesterday members of the Colorado House Transportation Committee killed HB1099, a bill that would have banned automated traffic enforcement statewide, including photo red light cameras. Top photo: After a legislative victory, members of the Denver Streets Partnership posed for a photo outside of the State Capitol: Jack Todd and Piep van Heuven of Bicycle Colorado, Jill […]
Pullquote: Denver’s disappearing green spaces are not “because of a growing population of people. It’s because of a growing population of cars.” —Alana Miller, Frontier Group

Wednesday’s Headlines

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From Streetsblog Fact check: Colo. Rep. Jovan Melton wants to ban red light cameras. But he justifies his position with false info. A hearing for his bill will happen at the State Capitol this afternoon. (Streetsblog Denver) Opinion: Denver paved over paradise and put up a parking lot. Contrary to the conclusion of a recent Denver […]
A parking lot across the street from Union Station, Denver's transit hub. Photo: David Sachs

Opinion: Denver Paved Over Paradise and Put up a Parking Lot

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As the population grows, “nearly half the land in Denver’s city limits is now paved or built over,” shrinking the city's green space, according to a recent series in Denver Post. But there’s something important missing in their account. The city’s pavement problem isn’t because of a growing population of people. It’s because of a growing population of cars. It’s the roads, driveways and – perhaps most egregiously – the parking lots we’ve built to accommodate more cars.