Watch Advocates Transform West Colfax Into a Place for People

Here’s a cool video from the Reimagine West Colfax event last month that converted West Colfax Avenue from a street designed strictly for cars into a place for people to gather, walk, and bike safely. The above time lapse shows volunteers constructing a parklet — a miniature gathering place reclaimed from traffic lanes or parking spaces — from basic materials.

The event was a success, and proved that West Colfax is in dire need of a permanent transformation. It also showed how advocates, merchants, and neighborhood residents can create a spark by taking ownership of city streets. They raised the money and put in the work to show city agencies what the neighborhood can be, and now it’s up to those agencies to listen and act.

To capitalize on the demo’s success, the West Colfax Business Improvement District, which led the effort, is hosting a charrette on “artist-inspired” crosswalks. Head over to Studio Completiva at 3275 West 14th Ave. #201 at noon this Tuesday if you’re interested in helping.

In the meantime, check out this time lapse of volunteers converting a lifeless West Colfax wall into a work of art.

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Wednesday’s Headlines

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