Drop a Pin on This Map to Tell DPW Where to Fix Dangerous Streets

A new map-based survey to inform Denver's Vision Zero plan. Image: City and County of Denver
A new map-based survey to inform Denver's Vision Zero plan. Image: City and County of Denver

The Hancock administration wants your help on its Vision Zero plan to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries on Denver streets.

Yesterday, the city posted a map-based survey that lets Denverites identify deficient pedestrian crossings, ineffective bike lanes, high-speed streets, and other dangerous conditions for walking and biking. The crowd-sourced data will help prioritize projects in the city’s Vision Zero “action plan,” which is slated to be released later this year.

“To create mobility freedom in our city, our people must feel safe no matter the mode of transportation they choose,” Mayor Michael Hancock said in a statement. “The city and state have considerable crash data, however, feedback from our residents regarding where they believe safety on our streets can be improved is just as important. This survey will help Denver broaden our insight into the safety of our streets and neighborhoods.”

A similar combination of crash data and public survey responses informed a “high injury network” map in Los Angeles showing hostile conditions for walking, said Rachael Bronson, a transportation planner with Denver Public Works. In the LA survey, 7 out of 10 respondents said they preferred walking to driving, but many did not have access to a safe pedestrian environment.

The survey is open to the public until April 30.

  • David – Why does this survey expire? It would seem to me that the survey could always be available in order to gain momentum, and to take in seasonality changes or track facility concerns.

  • Daniel

    LOL I love how the pin by default is already at the most dangerous intersection in the city for non-car users (Federal and Howard).

  • Disqus

    This is a great idea and should be a permanent fixture. Let us hold our praise until we see what the response is to our postings but this is a step in the right direction.

  • Joe Rhodes

    This is a great first step, but I would have liked to see a choice for “riding on sidewalk” and “riding without lights”. We really need some outreach, enforcement, and a citywide education effort to teach vehicular cycling if we want bikes to be taken seriously as a viable transportation option.

  • OpenCity

    Join us on OpenCity global and tell us what is happening around you. https://www.opencity.global/map

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