Tuesday’s Headlines

  • Six people hospitalized after two-vehicle crash near Colorado Springs (The Gazette)
  • Man accused of killing a 13-year-old and wounding three other people in a June road rage shooting denied more time to enter a plea. (AP)
  • Number of DUI arrests falls after CDOT cut nearly all funds it once provided to law enforcement agencies for high-visibility enforcement events. (Summit Daily)
  • Denver City Council approves scooters on streets and in bike lanes; companies will be allowed to expand their fleets (Denverite); but the micro-mobility devices will no longer be allowed on sidewalks. (5280)
  • Urbanist Chris Jones’ new video series of unfortunate intersections calls out pedestrian crossing at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital. (Denver7)
  • With the support of Mayor Hancock and the city council, Denver delays expansion of life-saving automated enforcement program after Councilman Kevin Flynn and his wife spend a weekend timing yellow lights. (Denver Post)
  • Denver eliminates parking meter fees for handicapped drivers. (CBS4)
  • RTD surveying residents and commuters about  plans for bus rapid transit service along Diagonal Highway between Longmont and Boulder. (Daily Camera) (Survey)
  • New Amtrak CEO may continue railroad’s focus on urban areas, potentially threatening the Southwest Chief line, which stops at Lamar, La Junta, and Trinidad. (HPPR)
  • Denver Hilltop residents flex their NIMBY muscles, persuade council to defeat 23-home development. (Denverite)
  • Event Tomorrow: Denver Streets Congress. (WalkDenver)
  • National headlines at Streetsblog USA.
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  • Riley Warton

    This seems like a mixed bag. On the one hand, scooters are finally allowed on bike lanes, which is definitely a good thing. On the other hand, NIMBYism is starting to gain traction in the Denver area. I believe this, not construction, is how we become like California.

    I hope we can find an opportunity to change zoning laws such that it encourages higher density housing like what happened in Mineapolis. That, alongside improvements to transit, would definitely be a great thing for the city.