Thursday’s Headlines

  • 1,700 Denver High School Students Will Soon Qualify for Free Bus Passes, but DPS’ Requirements Remain Complicated and Restrictive (Chalkbeat)
  • Olde Town Arvada Shop Owners Excited RTD’s G-Line Will Open in Early 2019 (CBS 4)
  • In Colorado Springs, Most Bus Lines Run Once an Hour, Mayor John Suthers Is Just Fine With an Inadequate System (Colorado Sun)
  • When Public Transit Fails to Reliably Get Vulnerable People Where They Need to Go, United Way Subsidizes Trips on Lyft, Including in Denver (Fast Company)
National headlines at Streetsblog USA
  • TakeFive

    “In Colorado Springs, Most Bus Lines Run Once an Hour, Mayor John Suthers Is Just Fine With an Inadequate System”

    The trend nationally by transit agencies is by necessity providing more cost-effective service. A multiyear downtrend in bus ridership coupled with increasing costs, routes that are less efficient are likely to see service reductions as agencies reallocate resources towards more ‘high priority’ corridors. Denver Moves has identified several corridors for increased investment: Colfax, Federal, Speer/Leetsdale and Colorado Blvd. plus So Broadway where this has already occurred. Off-peak frequency is becoming harder to justify. Obviously it will vary by city and funding and ridership.