Today’s Headlines

  • Driver Sandra Martinez Seriously Injures 11-Year-Old Walking to School in Aurora (DenPo)
  • Victims of I-70 Widening Wait and See Where They’ll Live Next (Denverite)
  • Public Works Gets Green Light to Borrow Millions for Drainage Project Tied to I-70 Widening (DenPo)
  • One in Seven A-Line Trains Runs Late (Fox31)
  • RTD Wants Passengers to Be Aware That System Could Be Target for Terrorism (Fox31)
  • CDOT Completes Bike Path Along I-70 Between DIA and Glenwood Springs (9News)
  • Denver Has Added More Homes This Year Than Last (Denverite)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Brian Schroder

    I sick and tired of everyone complaining every time a bicycle trail is built and it comes from their tax dollars. I pay taxes too and I don’t want my taxes going to the F-35, but they did anyway. Can we please just have a bicycle tax to shut these people up? I will gladly pay a bicycle fee or toll.

    • mckillio

      Agreed. I think there should be a special tax on bike and bike part sales.

      • Aaron

        I disagree. Bikes are a great alternative method of transportation, especially for low-income residents and those too young to drive. If anything, there should be tax-incentives to get more people, especially kids, biking as a form of transportation.

        Furthermore, for every commuter who ditches a car in favor of a bike, there is one less car on the road. Increased bike use will reduce traffic, so long as there is an infrastructure to support it.

        As for the trail mentioned above, that’s more about tourism than anything else. As long as tourism is a large part of Colorado’s economy, tourism dollars can pay for scenic bike trails.

        • mckillio

          I completely get your viewpoint but I think bike infrastructure projects would get less push back if we can point towards a specific revenue stream that only cyclists pay. Plus it would accelerate bike infrastructure projects. And I don’t think it would need to be high, maybe along the same lines as the SCFD tax of .1%

          • Brian Schroder

            Exactly less push back. Even though it would never come close to funding the improvements, but people would feel better. Just like the tolls collected from the I-70 toll lane would take 100 years to recoup the cost a the present rate of tolling.

          • mckillio

            The CO bike industry is over $1b a year I believe so at .1% it would only be $1m in revenue but it would be something to point to. Of course if we did 1% (which is fine for me personally but I can understand the potential objections from others) it would be more than $10m a year and that would really start to help things out.

        • TakeFive

          I think mckillio makes a good point… as do you.

          My guess is that the mountain bike trail is mostly used by residents. Many have a misguided notion about tourists. They are already a heavily taxed group and help pay for all manner of local and regional things, like FasTracks. In most states, CO included, tourism is the most valuable “export” they can have. Spend MORE state and local $’s to attract more tourists and grow the best industry going.

  • TakeFive

    With respect to performance of the A Line trains it does seem to be improving. It’s worth noting that the Eagle Project lines are the first new-build rail lines in the U.S that employ PTC or Positive Train Control. I’m told that BART had lots of issues when it started up.

  • surly trucker

    That 9News article makes it sound like there is a bike path from DIA to Glenwood, which would be rad, but is not the case.

    • Brian Schroder

      I’d like to see the 9news crew try and ride it and see how they feel about their safety. Some parts are great, and they improved the scariest part, but there’s still a long way to go to feel safe if you were to ride the whole thing. Speaking of which, what route would it take exactly?